HOW TO TAME YOUR PHONE

Minimalist homescreen

Studies show that cleaning room or desk is not just something your mom used to tell you to annoy you.

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How to Structure & Scale Company Communications

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Marie Kondo has become somewhat of a cultural phenomenon for introducing the world to the art of decluttering your physical space. Studies show that cleaning room or desk is not just something your mom used to tell you to annoy you. Turns out, removing clutter from our physical spaces and lives, has been proven to help increase concentration and lower potential risk of stress.

Similarly, the set up of your phone’s homescreen has a similar effect on the mind. Unlock up our phones between 50 and 100 times a day, our home screen is the first thing we’ll always end up on. Imagine walking in a messy room 100x times a day. That’d be a nightmare. Typically, homescreens will be just this one big messy pile of apps. It usually has alot of unncessary apps and potential time-wasters that should not be one fingertap away. 

Instead, we propose a more minimalistic way and deliberately which specific apps you should be able to access immediately. Here’s a few things that we suggest, pick & choose as you please

-Tools not feeds: keep the so-called ‘in & out’ apps which you use for a specific task or purpose and after which you go out of the app. Move all the apps with a scrollable feed to a second or even third page on your phone. Try to really be picky with the apps you keep on the homescreen

-Bundle in folders: all the other apps on your second / third screen should be organised in folders. This does not only looks much tidier, the more ‘opaque’ folders also reduce the visual stimulation from all those shiny app icons. We also recommend using the pull down search function, which is more intentional than relying on that swipe muscle memory.

-Do a background check: pick a soothing image for your background. There’s a some great very minimalist free wallpapers or choose a picture of a recent nature scene on holiday for example.

In the digital age we’re being bombarded with constant information & stimuli. The art of decluttering on & off screen, does show that indeed less, is more.

Nothing better than being able to learn from others, and get some insight in others building a company and tackling certain challenges. Challenges that you might run into, or where you already tried to crack the case. 

That's why we'd like to share this article with you, to learn from Levels: how they eliminated Slack, limited emails and which tools they use to communicate instead. 

Communication within a company can quickly get out of control as you add more people. So for our culture, we had to rethink our stack to avoid the "always-on" trap that kills deep work and productivity.

Michael Mizhrahi, Head of Operations at Levels

Stolp wants to be the 'conversation starter' for a new and healthier relationship with smartphones. The Scrollstop challenge invites young people to jointly question and improve the role of social media in their lives.

Julien Yee, CEO Stolp

I notice that social media can give me a lot of incentives. That is why I am very curious if I will get some more peace in my head by participating in Scrollstop for a week.

Kawtar Ehlalouch, DJ at MNM

Here's a short excerpt to get you started: 

"Modern knowledge workers increasingly spend most of their time communicating about their work rather than doing the work itself. It’s easy to see how de facto work communication tools and practices are failing — details are lost, communication overhead is high, and people are stressed. Many dislike work not because of the work itself but the amassing of plaque around the work. We’ve ended up with an always-on work culture in an effort to keep up, and our ability to do deep, focused work is diminished. The result is a stressful and ineffective work environment that can lead to burnout and dissatisfaction.

According to Brook’s law, the number of communication paths grows at a faster rate than the number of people you add to the group. As a result, what worked for a small team of 10 won’t work for a team of 40. Actively designing and tending to the tools & process is essential."

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Get your own Stolp and make it a daily ritual to deconnect and reconnect.

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